It’s Sunday night, and you’re looking ahead to your week of business planning, cranking out client work, and a full schedule of client calls. It’s all mapped out beautifully in your planner.
And then your toddler gets a stomach bug. And then you catch it from him. And then a storm wipes out power (and even worse: internet). For a week.

Even if you don’t foresee any major changes, life is gonna happen—be it sickness or an unexpected last-minute vacation opportunity.  Put the the right systems in place, and you can step away while your business keeps running in your absence.

And that’s the little stuff. Then there is the big stuff—chronic illness and related treatment, a death in the family, or say, getting pregnant (surprise!). Lately, I’ve been coding websites in brief moments between nausea, and I’ve been brainstorming upcoming offers at 3am through pregnancy-induced insomnia. And I take a nap on days when I can’t get past the pregnancy exhaustion. It ain’t pretty, but it works.

One of the reasons I love running my own business is that I get to decide when I take time off. Yeah, it’s easy to seeing working all the time as the road to success … but I’ve figured out that it isn’t best for me, and I’m guessing it’s not best for you either. Most people who start their own businesses want more control over their time. They want to be able to go to their kid’s school play or have lunch with their college bestie who happens to be passing through town. They want more flexibility, in an effort to chase that fleeting sense of “work-life balance.”

[bctt tweet=”Most entrepreneurs want more control over their time. Here are some ways to make it happen. ” username=”megcasebolt”]

Technology can get in our way in moving toward that goal. (Just because you can respond to client email anytime and anywhere doesn’t mean you should.) But it also lets us go about life while things keep happening in our business.

I recently took a big road trip with my mom and son for a family funeral; my clients didn’t know I was gone. I kept up communication, my blog and social rolled out as planned, and I met all my deadlines … even though I was in rural Vermont with no wifi or cell phone signal.

With baby #2 on the way this summer, I’m thinking about my maternity leave. I get to decide how much time to take off and when & how I come back. But during that time, my website and communication tools will help keep things running:

  • My email nurture sequence means leads won’t go cold even if I’m not in my inbox every day. That means when I’m ready to put in more time, I’m not starting from square one.
  • I’ll set up autoresponders so that prospects know that response times will be slower and clients know what to do if they need help.
  • And while I may not be taking on new projects for a few weeks, my onboarding system will let me keep people moving through the pipeline when I am ready—with minimal input from me.

In other words, I’m going to take some time off to snuggle that new little one, and my business isn’t going to come to a grinding halt. That’s exactly what happened with baby #1 and I learned my lesson—and I want to save you from the same fate. Because even if you aren’t or never plan to be pregnant, life is gonna happen—could be sickness or unexpected free vacation opportunity. With the the right systems in place, you can do what you want and need to do and your business will keep going.

[bctt tweet=”During my maternity leave this summer. my website will keep things running while I binge Netflix.” ]

Ready to life-proof your business? Get started here:

Taking vacation can be tough for us entrepreneurs.

Why is it so hard to step away from the keyboard?

For me, it’s a massive case of #FOMO, or “fear of missing out.”

Over the years, I’ve figured out some easy ways to make my website work harder, giving myself peace of mind to take some much-needed time off from my business … and returning from travel refreshed & ready to get to work.

Check out my secrets today.

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